Co-Investigators

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Pete Fitzgibbons

Pete works on all projects investigating auditory temporal processes in older persons. 

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Grace H. Yeni-Komshian

Grace contributes her expertise in speech perception and bilingualism to all projects investigating perception of accented English.


  Current Students

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Maya Freund

Maya is a third-year graduate student in the University of Maryland's Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology. She is involved in the project investigating the effects of accented English on speech perception in older listeners.

 

 

 

Calli Fodor

Calli is a third-year graduate student in the University of Maryland's Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology. She is involved in a project investigating effects of background noise on speech recognition in a group conversation, which is being conducted in non-lab, everyday settings. This project is in collaboration with Doug Brungart and Ken Grant at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.

 

 

 

 

Kelsey Oppler

Kelsey is a second year student in the University of Maryland's Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology. She is involved in the project investigating the effects of accented English on speech perception in older listeners.

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Rebecca Bieber, Au.D.

Rebecca is a Ph.D. student in the University of Maryland's Hearing and Speech Science program. She received her Au.D. from the University of Maryland in 2017.  She has worked in the Hearing Lab for five years. Her capstone research investigated the effects of accented English on speech perception in younger and older listeners. 

 

 

Anna Tinnemore, Au.D.

Anna is a Ph.D. student in the Neuroscience and Cognitive Sciences Program (NACS) with Hearing and Speech Sciences as her home department. She received her Au.D. from the University of Arizona in 2017. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jaclyn Schurman, Au.D. 

Jaci is a Ph.D. student in the University of Maryland's Hearing and Speech Science program. She received her Au.D. from the University of Maryland in 2015. She has worked in the Hearing Lab for two years, and also worked in Monita Chatterjee's Cochlear Implant and Psychophysics Lab. Jaci worked on collaborative projects examining the influence of cognitive load on speech recognition in noise with Ken Grant and Doug Brungart at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.

 

 

Julie Cohen, Au.D.

Julie is a Ph.D. student in the University of Maryland's Hearing and Speech Science program. Julie earned her Au.D. from the University of Maryland in May, 2012 after having worked in the lab for four years. Her capstone project assessed the impact of visual distraction on speech recognition in noise. She currently is a research audiologist at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.

 

 

 

Maureen Shader, Au.D.

Maureen is a Ph.D. student in the University of Maryland's Hearing and Speech Science program. She received her Doctor of Audiology (AuD) degree from Gallaudet University in 2013. She is currently studying speech perception in older adults with cochlear implants.  Her research project is investigating the effect of cochlear implant stimulation rate on sentence recognition in young, middle-age, and older adults.

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Jessica Wess

Jessica is a Ph.D student in the Neuroscience and Cognitive Sciences Program (NACS) with Hearing and Speech Sciences as her home department. Jessica is primarily working at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center with Joshua Bernstein and Ken Grant. She is interested in studying hearing in people with single sided deafness who receive a cochlear implant in their deaf ear. She investigates spectral and loudness mismatches between cochlear implants and normal hearing ears using vocoder simulations, and is collecting data for some of her studies in the Hearing Lab.

 


Alumni

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Amber Frazier

Amber is a fourth-year graduate student in the University of Maryland's Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology. She was involved in a multi-site study of the efficacy of long-term training in hearing aid users. Her capstone research investigated the effects of hearing aid compression release times on the perception of temporal speech contrasts. 

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David Jara

David is a fourth-year graduate student in the University of Maryland's Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology. He is involved in the project investigating the effects of accented English on speech perception in older listeners.

 

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Arielle Iola

Arielle Iola is a first-year graduate student in the University of Texas- Dallas' Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology.  She worked in the lab for two years, particularly on the project, "Multi-site study of the efficacy of speech perception training."  Arielle was awarded the Karin E. Young Memorial Scholarship in 2016, which is awarded to one undergraduate student per year who plans to pursue a career in Audiology.  This scholarship was established in memory of Karin Young, a former student in the HESP Department who was a trail-blazing audiologist in the field of cochlear implants.

 

 

Daniel Eisenberg

Daniel is a fourth year student in the University of Maryland's Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology. He was involved in the multi-site study of the efficacy of long-term training in hearing aid users.

 

 

 

 

Sadie Coleman, Au.D.

Sadie earned her Au.D. from the University of Maryland in May, 2016. She worked on a project to evaluate auditory working memory as a function of age and its relationship to speech processing across various listening conditions.

 

 

 

 

 

Mary Barrett

Mary earned her Au.D. from the University of Maryland in May, 2017. Mary was involved in a project investigating effects of background noise on speech recognition in a group conversation, which is being conducted in non-lab, everyday settings. This project is in collaboration with Doug Brungart and Ken Grant at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Her capstone research investigated effects of audiovisual distracters on speech recognition in younger and older listeners. 

 

 

 

Laura Taliaferro

Laura is a former student of the University of Maryland's Doctoral Program in Clinical Audiology. She worked in the Hearing Brain Lab on the multi-site study of the efficacy of long-term training in hearing aid users.  

 

 

 

 

 

Kerrianne Clark, Au.D.

Kerrianne earned her Au.D. from the University of Maryland in May, 2016. Her capstone research project investigated effects of background noise on speech recognition in a group conversation, which was being conducted in non-lab, everyday settings. This project was in collaboration with Doug Brungart and Ken Grant at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.

 

 

 

Chelsea Carter, Au.D.

Chelsea earned her Au.D. from the University of Maryland in May, 2016. Her capstone research project investigated auditory working memory as a function of age and its relationship to speech processing across various listening conditions.

 

 

 

 

Hannah Willison, Au.D. 

Hannah earned her Au.D. from the University of Maryland in May, 2015.  She worked in the Hearing Lab for four years, on projects concerned with perception of accented English. Hannah's capstone research project investigated the window of temporal asynchrony for speech recognition by younger and older listeners.

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Megan Espinosa, Au.D. 

Megan earned her Au.D. from the University of Maryland in May, 2015. She worked on the multi-site study of the efficacy of long-term training in hearing aid users.  

 

 

 

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Erin Pickett, Au.D.

Erin earned her Au.D. from the University of Maryland in May, 2014. She worked in the lab for three years on projects concern with older listeners' perception of accented English. She presented her research on perception of lexical stress in native and Spanish-accented English by younger and older listeners with normal hearing at the 2013 Aging and Speech Communication Conference at Indiana University.

 

 

Danielle Zion, Au.D.

Danielle earned her Au.D. from the University of Maryland in 2012. She took the lead on a project comparing recognition of naturally fast and time-compressed speech by younger and older listeners. Danielle now works in the Hearing and Speech Center at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. 

 

 

 

Chris Waldroup, Au.D.

Chris earned his Au.D. from the University of Maryland in May, 2013. He worked on projects that investigated perception of accented English by younger and older listeners. His Capstone project assessed the efficacy of an auditory training program to improve perception of accented English. He currently is an army audiologist. 

 

 


    Collaborators

Samira Anderson, Ph.D.

Samira is an Assistant Professor in the Dept. of Hearing and Speech Sciences at the University of Maryland. Her research focus is on neural processing of speech sounds, which she investigates with electrophysiologic and psychophysical measures. She is collaborating with the lab on projects concerned with neural processing of temporal cues in speech segments by younger and older listeners. 

 

 

Carol Espy-Wilson, Ph.D.

Carol is Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Maryland.  She is a collaborator on studies of processing natural rapid-rate speech and signal processing techniques to improve speech intelligibility for hearing-impaired listeners.  Her collaborative research with the Hearing Research Lab has been funded by a grant by the ADVANCE program at UMD.

 

 

 

Matt Goupell, Ph.D.

Matt is an Assistant Professor in the Dept. of Hearing and Speech Sciences at the University of Maryland.  Matt's research focus is binaural processing and cochlear implants.  He is collaborating with the Hearing Research Lab on studies of age-related changes in auditory processing among individuals who wear cochlear implants.

 

 

 

Doug Brungart, Ph.D.

Dr. Brungart is currently the Chief Scientist at the Audiology and Speech Center at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Current major research areas include: development of auditory fitness-for-duty standards, evaluation of hearing loss prevalence in the armed services, development of functional measures of speech understanding/perception, validation of DoD hearing profile standards and laboratory and field trials of hearing protection. He works with lab members on a variety of projects that investigate the interplay between auditory abilities and cognitive function among military personnel, as well as development of functional measures of speech understanding/perception. 

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Ken Grant, Ph.D.

Dr. Grant is the Chief of Scientific and Clinical Studies at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.  Dr. Grant's research has been concerned primarily with the integration of eye and ear for speech perception in both normal and hearing-impaired populations using behavioral and neurophysiological measures. Current work in this area is focused on changes in cognitive load as a result of combining auditory and visual cues and the impact of age, hearing loss, and traumatic brain injury on one's ability to selectively attend to one or more targets in the presence of multiple competing auditory and visual sources.

 

Stephanie Kuchinsky, Ph.D. 

Dr. Kuchinsky is a research assistant professor at the Maryland Neuroimaging Center at the University of Maryland. In addition to being an MNC faculty member, she is also an Assistant Research Scientist at UMD’s Center for Advanced Study of Language.The goal of Stefanie Kuchinsky’s research program is to evaluate and improve speech and text comprehension in adverse conditions. Using functional neuroimaging and pupillometry techniques, Dr. Kuchinsky investigates the sensory and attention systems that support speech-in-noise understanding with the goal of developing effective interventions that optimize both comprehension and cognitive effort.

 

Jonathan Simon, Ph.D. 

Dr. Simon is a professor at the University of Maryland, with a joint appointment between the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the Department of Biology, and the Institute for Systems Research. His expertise is in applied and theoretical auditory neuroscience. The goal of his research is to understand how the auditory cortex processes complex sounds such as speech and other natural sounds using magnetoencephalography (MEG), because of its high temporal resolution (milliseconds), reasonable spatial resolution (millimeters), and silent operation. 

 

Shihab Shamma, Ph.D.

Dr. Shamma is a member of the University of Maryland faculty since 1984 when he started as an Assistant Professor in the Electrical Engineering Department. He is associated with the Institute for Systems Research. The goal of his research is the representation of the acoustic signal at various levels in mammalian auditory systems. This ranges from theoretical models of auditory processing in early and central auditory stages, to neurophysiological investigations of the auditory cortex, to psychoacoustical experiments of human perception of acoustic spectral profiles.

 

Jonathan Fritz, Ph.D.

Dr. Fritz has been an ISR research scientist since 2004, and an associate research scientist since 2009. He is also a researcher in the Section on Brain and Language at the National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Fritz's research in task-related adaptive plasticity in auditory processing currently focuses on behavioral physiology studies of the ferret primary and secondary auditory cortex. He also is interested in the neurobiology of auditory attention, learning and memory as well as auditory perception, including psychophysical studies, perceptual and behavioral lesion studies, and neurophysiological studies of ferret frontal cortex and its role in top-down control of auditory processing.

 

Patrick Kanold, Ph.D.

Dr. Kanold studies the development and plasticity of the brain, in particular how periods of learning and plasticity are initiated and controlled. His work focuses on the development of the central auditory and visual system in particular on the role of early cortical circuits in brain wiring. He uses advanced neurophysiological, in vivo imaging, optogenetic, molecular and computational techniques. His work furthers our understanding of how prenatal and postnatal brain injury contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders such as cerebral palsy, epilepsy and schizophrenia.